Fast Food (1989)

USA,
92m
colour

An American borderline fantasy film directed by Michael A. Simpson.

Premise

Auggie is desperate to make it big and his latest bright idea is to turn his cousin's garage into a burger restaurant. Together, they develop a special sauce which has potent aphrodisiac properties which, inevitably, makes them very popular. But it also makes them a powerful enemy in the shape of Wrangler Bob, the king of

Credits

Crew
Directed by: Michael A. Simpson
Copyright 1989 Fries Entertainment, Inc.
Fries Entertainment presents a Double Helix Films production. A Michael A. Simpson film
Executive Producer: Jerry Silva
Produced by: Stan Wakefield and Michael A. Simpson
Associate Producer for Varney Productions: Phil Walden
Coordinating Producer: Randal Patrick
Screenplay by: Clark Brandon & Lanny Horn
Story by: Scott Sowers & Jim Basile
Additional Dialogue: Randal Patrick
Director of Photography: Bill Mills
Editor: John D. Allen
Music [opening titles] Music Score Composed and Produced by [end titles]: Iris Gillon
Sound Mixer: Mary Ellis
Wardrobe Supervisor: Tracy Thornton
Hair & Make-up Artist: Maritza Rodriguez
Computer Visual Effects: Julie Newman
Art Director: Shad Leach

Cast
Clark Brandon (Auggie)
Tracy Griffith (Samantha)
Randal Patrick (Drew)
Lanny Horn (Calvin)
Blake Clark (E.G. McCormick)
Pamela Springsteen (Mary Beth Bensen)
Traci Lords (Dixie Love)
Kevin McCarthy (Judge Reinholte)
Michael J. Pollard (Bud)
Jim Varney as Wrangler Bob
Randi Layne (Alexandra Lowell)
Don Ferguson (Dean Witler)
Terry Hobbs (Donald Frump III)
Amy Bryson (Sheryl)
Kathleen Webster (Wendy)
Julie Ridley (Dr Duran)
Paige Conner (Tracy)
Tom Key (Skinner)
Bruce Evers (Agent Dikworth)
Benji Wilhoite (Sonny)

Alternative Titles

Limba, Limba, Lambada – West Germany

References

Periodicals

  • The Hollywood Reporter vol.305 no.29 (20 December 1988) p.24 – note
  • The Hollywood Reporter vol.307 no.43 (5 June 1989) pp.4, 14 – review
  • Sight & Sound vol.2 no.1 (May 1992) p.67 – note
  • Variety 3 May 1989 p.17 – credits, review