Dracula Prince of Darkness (1966)

UK, USA, 1965
86m 6s (UK – video), 90m, 8,087 feet
35mm, filmed in Techniscope, Technicolor, 2.35:1
mono, English

A British/American horror film directed by Terence Fisher. It was Hammer’s third Dracula film and the second to feature Christopher Lee as the Count.

Plot Summary

A group of English tourists in the Carpathian mountains meet Father Sandor, an abbot who is trying to get the locals to let go of the past and forget Count Dracula, destroyed by Van Helsing many years before. But they are taken in by Klove, Dracula’s manservant, who sacrifices one of the travelers, using his blood to bring Dracula back from the dead…

Credits

* = uncredited

Crew
Directed by: Terence Fisher
© MCMLXVI [1966] Hammer Film Productions Limited
A Seven Arts-Hammer Film production. Released through Warner-Pathe Distributors Limited
Produced by: Anthony Nelson Keys
Production Manager: Ross MacKenzie
Screenplay by: John Sansom [real name: Jimmy Sangster]
From an Idea by: John Elder [real name: Anthony Hinds]
Based on characters created by Bram Stoker
Assistant Director: Bert Batt
Continuity: Lorna Selwyn
Director of Photography: Michael Reed
Camera Operator: Cece Cooney
Supervising Editor: James Needs
Editor: Chris Barnes
Music Composed by: James Bernard
Musical Supervisor: Philip Martell
Sound Recordist: Ken Rawkins
Sound Editor: Roy Baker
RCA Sound Recording
Wardrobe: Rosemary Burrows
Make-up: Roy Ashton
Hair Stylist: Frieda Steiger
Special Effects: Bowie Films Ltd
Production Designer: Bernard Robinson
Art Director: Don Mingaye
Produced at Bray Studios, England
Stunts: Peter Diamond *, Eddie Powell *

Cast
Christopher Lee (Count Dracula)
Barbara Shelley (Helen)
Andrew Keir (Father Sandor)
Francis Matthews (Charles Kent)
Suzan Farmer (Diana)
Charles Tingwell (Alan Kent)
Thorley Walters (Ludwig)
Walter Brown (Brother Mark)
Philip Latham (Klove)
George Woodbridge (landlord)
Jack Lambert (Brother Peter)
Philip Ray (priest)
Joyce Hemson (mother)
John Maxim (coach driver)
Peter Cushing [Van Helsing (in archive footage) – uncredited]

Alternative Titles

The Bloody Scream of Dracula – early title
Blut für Dracula – Germany
Disciple of Dracula – early title
Dracula – Sweden
Dracula 3 – early title
Dracula, prince des ténèbres – France
Drácula, príncipe de las tinieblas – Spain
Dracula principe delle tenebre – Italy
Revenge of Dracula – early title

Sequel to
Dracula (1958)
The Brides of Dracula (1960)

Sequels
Dracula Has Risen from the Grave (1968)
Taste the Blood of Dracula (1969)
Scars of Dracula (1970)
Dracula A.D. 1972 (1972)
The Satanic Rites of Dracula (1973)
The Legend of the 7 Golden Vampires (1974)

Remake
Dracula, Demon of the Night (1975)

Extracts included in
Ex-S: The Wicker Man (1998)
The Many Faces of Christopher Lee (1995)
The World of Hammer: Dracula & the Undead (1994)
The World of Hammer: Hammer Stars: Christopher Lee (1994)
The World of Hammer: Vamp (1994)

See also
Bloodlust (1979)

Press

1966
Monthly Film Bulletin vol.33 no.385 (February 1966) p.22
Apart from one or two welcome innovations – notably the sort of Instant Vampire recipe by which Dracula is resuscitated, and his final destruction by drowning rather by the usual procedures – this is the same old hash as before. […] The interiors are quite tastefully decorated, but script, direction and acting (except for Philip Latham’s sinister butler, and Andrew Keir’s forthright Father Sandor) leave much to be desired.

References

Periodicals

  • Amateur Cine World vol.10 no.1 (1 July 1965) p.10 – review
  • The Daily Cinema no.9159 (29 December 1965) p.8 – review
  • Dark Terrors 3 p.16 – note
  • Dark Terrors no.4 (July/August 1992) pp.13-21 – illustrated credits, production notes, synopsis
  • Empire June 1999 p.152 – review (by Kim Newman)
  • Famous Monsters of Filmland No.30 (September 1964) p.8 – note (Fright films to come)
  • Films and Filming vol.11 no.11 (August 1965) p.55
  • Flesh and Blood no.4 p.18 – review (by Harvey Fenton)
  • Hammer Horror no.2 (April 1995) pp.16-33 – illustrated credits, synopsis, production notes, review
  • The House That Hammer Built no.10 (October 1998) p.102 – note
  • Kine Weekly no.3039 (30 December 1965) p.13 – review
  • Mad Movies no.1 (June 1972) p.unpaginated – credits, review
  • Monthly Film Bulletin vol.33 no.385 (February 1966) p.22 – credits, synopsis, review
  • Photon no.19 p.42 – review
  • Shivers no.16 p.38 – review
  • Sight & Sound vol.5 no.4 (April 1995) pp.61-62 – video review
  • Sight & Sound vol.22 no.4 (April 2012) p.85 – video review (by Vic Pratt)
  • Variety 19 January 1966 – credits, review
  • Video Watchdog no.42 pp.24-25 – review

Books

  • The Charm of Evil: The Life and Films of Terence Fisher by Wheeler Winston Dixon pp.185, 269, 274, 332-340, 347; 535-537 – notes; credits
  • English Gothic by Jonathan Rigby pp.47, 124-126 – notes, review
  • The Hammer Story by Marcus Hearn and Alan Barnes pp.96-97 – illustrated article, review (by Marcus Hearn and Alan Barnes)
  • Hoffman’s Guide to SF, Horror and Fantasy Movies 1991-1992 p.112 – credits, review
  • The Illustrated Vampire Movie Guide by Stephen Jones p.47 – credits, review
  • Reference Guide to Fantastic Films by Walt Lee p.113 – credits
  • Terence Fisher by Peter Hutchings pp.36, 52, 54-67, 91, 117, 124, 139-143, 144, 145, 146, 148, 152, 153, 156, 164 – notes
  • Terence Fisher: Horror, Myth and Religion by Paul Leggett pp.66-75, 93, 115, 118, 173, 177, 185, 188 – notes

Other sources

  • British National Film Catalogue vol.4 (1966) – credits, synopsis