All I Want Is You… and You… and You… (1974)

UK, 1974
92m, 8244 ft
35mm film, Fujicolor
mono, English

A British borderline horror film directed by Bob Kellett. According the [http://collections-search.bfi.org.uk/web/Details/ChoiceFilmWorks/150113740 BFI database] the film “seems to have been lost some time between 1974 and 1986 during transfer of collections/distribution rights.”

Plot Summary

An American advertising tycoon interviews prospective candidates for the vice-presidency of his company – including a knife-wielding maniac dressed as Harpo Marx – at the therapy clinic Idyll House.

Credits

Crew

Director: Bob Kellett
Production Company: Globebest
Producer: Wilbur Stark
Script: Jonathan Freud
Photography: Grenville Middleton
Editor: Peter Musgrave
Music: Wilbur Stark
Sound Recording: A. Colletta
Art Director: Carlotta Barrow

Cast
Freddie Earlle (Dr Brack)
David Griffin (Freddie Millbank)
Ian Trigger (Joe Hartford)
Sheila Steafel (Wilma Brack)
Marie Rogers (Polly Pearce)
Hilary Pritchard (Fredda Donohue)
Carol Cleveland (Eli Hartford)
Barry Linehan (Bull Donohue)
Noel Trevarthen (Frank Pearce)
Tim Blackstone, Berrick Kyler (boys)
Julia McCarthy (wife)
Ronnie Stevens (husband)
Louise Stark (Helga)
Koo Stark (Jennifer Ready)
Derek Griffiths (taxi driver)

Press

1975
Monthly Film Bulletin vol.42 no.495 (April 1975) p.75
“You just think of the vice-presidency”; “Thanks. I’ll just think about the vice”. If anything could further nail the coffin lid on such less-than-sparkling badinage, it’s the actors concerned doing intermittent imitations of the Marx brothers, stealing at least one cumulative gag from Waiting for Godot, and audibly pausing while notional waves of laughter (in reality, one suspects, as slow off the mark as Godot himself) sweep over the auditorium. All I Want Is You … and You … and You … comes in limply somewhere between the soft-core porn market and British comedies in the style of On the Buses, leaving one with a distinct impression that the cast enjoyed themselves considerably more than any prospective audience could hope to do. – from a review by Nigel Gearing

References

Periodicals
CinemaTV Today no.10122 (22 February 1975) p.13 – review
Monthly Film Bulletin vol.42 no.495 (April 1975) p.75 – credits, review (by Nigel Gearing)
Monthly Film Bulletin vol.42 no.498 (July 1975) p.163 – note